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The Manhattan Neighborhoods with the Most Children

March 17, 2015

Best Manhattan Neighborhoods for Families

Which neighborhoods in Manhattan have the most and least children? Where could you move in Manhattan, as a family with children, and know that your kids will have plenty of playmates nearby?

Or if you're in the camp that believes children are better seen than heard (and, if possible, not seen at all) where could you move to enjoy a stroller-free life?

Our NYC real estate data experts here at AddressReport crunched the numbers from the most recent New York City housing data set to rank the Manhattan neighborhoods with the greatest proportion of children living in households vs those that have the least.

The results are not necessarily what you'd expect.

Manhattan Neighborhoods with the Most Children

According to our analysis, Battery Park City is the most "kid friendly" neighborhood in the borough. Approximately 36% of households there have one or more kids at home.

While Battery Park City isn't the neighborhood most people immediately think of as having packs of kids running around, the numbers actually make a lot of sense when you consider that it's a largely residential neighborhood with nearly a third of its area comprised of parkland.

These are the five Manhattan neighborhoods with the most kids on a per-household basis:

Battery Park City36% of households have at least one child
East Harlem32% of households have at least one child
Harlem29% of households have at least one child
Tribeca26% of households have at least one child
Lower East Side20% of households have at least one child


Manhattan Neighborhoods with the Least Children

On the other end of the spectrum, we've analyzed the 5 Manhattan Neighborhoods with the lowest percentage of households with kids. 

This end of the list holds a little truer to the stereotypes people have about NYC neighborhoods. For example, Wall Street (also known as FiDi or the Financial District) and Hell's Kitchen are tied for the neighborhoods with the least amount of children, at just 6% of households each. 

But on closer examination, there are some real surprises, including households in the West Village, Gramercy, and Soho (all known, typically, as family friendly) having as few children, proportionally, as Midtown.

These are the five Manhattan neighborhoods with the fewest kids (actually, six neighborhoods, because of ties):

Wall Street / Financial District6% of households have at least one child
Hell's Kitchen6% of households have at least one child
Midtown7% of households have at least one child
Soho7% of households have at least one child
West Village7% of households have at least one child
Gramercy7% of households have at least one child


Picking the Best Neighborhood for Families with Children

Of course, there's more than just the relative likelihood of living near other parents to consider when picking a family-friendly neighborhood. When you look up an address on AddressReport, you'll see all kinds of interesting statistics about your potential future neighbors and neighborhood. 

Key data points include factors like median age in the neighborhood, the number of married vs single neighbors, education levels, income levels, how people in the neighborhood tend to get to work (bike share? subway? drive?) and when they leave for work in the morning, whether they're predominantly renters or owners, and much more.

Then there are those quality-of-life considerations, from the number of rats in the neighborhood, to the type and quality of the neighborhood's food delivery options, to the neighborhood's access to green spaces like public parks and farmers' markets.

If you're looking to explore further, look up any address on AddressReport to discover:

  • crime stats

  • demographic data

  • building complaints & violations

  • bed bugs, roaches, rats

  • plumbing, heat, and hot water

  • subway access, commute times

  • street and construction noise

  • development & alteration history